Tag Archives: lee silverman voice training

Lee Silverman Voice Training gives patients a sense of empowerment


The world is so uncertain. We live every day, usually hoping for things to come or not come. We often spend our time worrying about things we cannot control. At worst, Parkinson’s can be a dark stranger taking little things away from us every day, or at best, a pain in the ass which we have to cope with. A disease that is incurable leaves few options of what you can do. Our family has chosen to try and do all we can do.

We know that through exercise, I can lessen my symptoms, and research tells us that it can also slow the progression of the disease. So, this weekend I had the privilege to work the LSVT (Lee Silverman Voice Training). BIG people in a certification training session for Physical Therapists and Occupation Therapists.

This program is specifically designed to address movement symptoms of PD. There we 80 participants who were learning about this method, hoping to become certified. I was asked to be a patient in a typical therapy session, so the trainees could observe a session with a live patient. A gross understatement would be that I had fun. Imagine me having a captive audience to show off to, while being fully “on meds.”

By the end of 30 minutes I was in a full sweat and ready to go home. The trainer had taken me out of my comfort zone as he coached me to perform “bigger.” Cecily and I left and went home to relax and prepare for the next day.

The second day was an open presentation of the LSTV product to the local PD community. I had distributed the flyer to members of our support group and five of us were there. The program notice included a presentation on the program followed by a session where the newly trained therapists could work with actual patients, which I thought was a great idea. I was pleasantly surprised when all our group volunteered to be training patients. Expecting to be able to closely watch how our group did, I found my trainers (8 of them) enthusiastic about having a shot at Bob. As each one had their chance to show me an exercise, their enthusiasm drove me to a “bring it “attitude, which led to a very high-level session. All the time all of my trainers focused on my performance and condition in a controlled environment. We even worked on my golf swing. After a few practices I thought I was Freddy Couples (on crack). Only after seeing the video did I realize that the visuals did not match my mind’s eye. (I had two spotters.)

At the end of the one-hour session, we duplicated performance tests and I found that I had achieved a 50% improvement in flexibility and speed. Only then did I have an opportunity to observe other members of our group. Regardless of symptoms, every test subject was showing significantly improved movement. It was truly a moving and exciting moment for all of us, including the trainers.

Patients came away with an enormous sense of empowerment. There was something we could do. It would not be easy, but we had choices. It was a BIG moment.

So regardless of what you choose to help you push back the daily mudslide of Parkinson’s, you have choices. Choose now, be a warrior.

TWO BIG SHOES ON AGAIN